PRE-CRISIS MANAGEMENT

Posted in Anticipation, CRISIS MANAGEMENT STARTS WITH PLANNING, Ethics and Crisis Management, PRE-CRISIS PLANNING on September 12th, 2012 by mnayor

 The term crisis management itself is enough to send executives and managers scurrying back to their desks, burying their heads in papers so they can be overlooked. If one is tapped to head a pre-crisis management team, it’s like being the designated fire marshal for your floor in the building. If you are appointed to manage a post-crisis event, you may have everything to lose and nothing to gain. After all you may be in the cross hairs of public opinion and totally distracted from your regular role in sales, marketing, advertising, or finance.

 

But crisis management is a vital function. It should be recognized as such by the CEO of any organization and communicated down the chain. Any one event, whether due to totally external factors or self created, a crisis can set an organization back years or deep six it, if not handled properly. Handling that one event may well far outweigh for example the importance of the market roll-out of a new product.

 

Pre-crisis management is preventative in nature. It helps you avoid a crisis. It also prepares you for handling a crisis in the event one occurs.

 

Post crisis management implements the plan you have prepared in anticipation of a crisis occurring.

 

So, what is a crisis. It can be any event or circumstance that has the potential for negatively impacting your organization whether it is damage to reputation, operations, markets, or products. Tainted, shoddy or defective products. High profile litigation. A government investigation. The resignation of a key officer. An environmental or natural disaster. n internet failure. Illegal employee activities. Computer data loss. A walkout or strike. The list goes on

 

The spill-over effect is the negative impact the event will have on your stakeholders – your customers, your suppliers, investors, employees, government officials, the public at large, the media. Major crises happen all the time. We have seen several  recently and they are not pretty.PennStateof course, Wal-Mart’s Mexican subsidiary bribery story, Netflix’s pricing fiasco, Olympus Corporation’s cooked books, J&J’s poor handling of product recalls. These stories and many more underscore the necessity for pre-crisis management.

 

Of course we are not all Wal-Mart or Johnson & Johnson.  But the owner of the local retail toy store has as much to gain from crisis management as the big boys. Bad press, damaged relationships, investor confidence, employee morale, supplier cut-offs, civil and criminal liability – none of these things happen only to giant institutions.

 

How to start. It’s easy. Brainstorm. No one can anticipate an exact crisis but we can all speculate as to what our organizations may be vulnerable. List these vulnerabilities and what you can do about them. Example: you are a farmer and need to protect yourself against weather-related events. Insurance coverage, smudge pots, protective coverings etc. may be your answer. Example: your supplier of critical components has had problems. Begin identifying and ordering from alternative sources of supply, vertical integration, overseas sources etc. may be your answer. Example: you produce or distribute products for human consumption. Check your sources for utmost reliability, third party liability insurance, random quality checks.

 

Other potential solutions to problems: alternate transportation sources, duplicate bookkeeping and records backup, key man insurance, family succession planning. All these actions, if circumstances warrant, can be extremely helpful in avoiding you being caught unaware.

 

Next, assemble a team, a core group made up of the CEO, your PR people and legal counsel. Identify those managers or employees who have the best in-depth knowledge and are capable of attacking a problem in their respective areas. Identify those managers and employees who are capable of succinctly explaining issues to top management and/or to the public. Assemble this team and assign roles. Ensure that you have an organized document management system in place that preserves data and information and be ready for fact finding. Develop a communications strategy which includes assigning responsibility for communication content and approval, and assigning the role of spokesperson. Recognize the need for different messages for different stakeholders. develop responses for different media, from press releases, on air responses and social media.

 

Don’t think you can handle everything in-house. Your attorney, your public relations consultant or those who you rely on for sage advice will come in handy. Outsiders have a broader perspective than you may have and can assist to anticipate problems, develop a plan, assist in investigations and document management, assess any legal exposure and help prepare public statements.

 

One observation I personally believe to be of utmost importance.  If you look at some of the highly publicized crises of the day, many stem from lax ethics. Enhancing the bottom line has many times replaced the goal of doing the right thing, often at the expense of customers. Increasing short term profits may make a hero out of someone today but the actions taken to accomplish this may have severe repercussions to an organization tomorrow. A CEO can pressure everyone to redouble their efforts to increase revenues and profits and let employees find their own path or a CEO can communicate the need for high ethical standards which in the long run, will bear more fruit and allow everyone to come to work the next day. Crisis management especially crisis planning is a crucial effort to manage those events that have slipped by you. The worst and the best that can happen is that you will never have to implement your plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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FAILURE TO ANTICIPATE: THE WALMART EXAMPLE

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crisis Management, corporate integrity, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Honesty and directness in dealing with a crisis, Wal-Mart on May 3rd, 2012 by mnayor

On April 22nd, 2012 The New York Times broke a huge story on Wal-Mart’s Walmex subsidiary. The subsidiary is alleged to have systematically engaged in bribery in order to grease the wheels of  its store expansion program in Mexico. Two of its most senior executives have been directly implicated in the scheme and the subsequent cover-up. The fallout has been dramatic including upcoming Congressional and Justice Department investigations and investigations within Mexico, a precipitous drop in Wal-Mart’s stock price, and perhaps worst of all, a huge black eye to WalMart’s reputation for integrity.

 This is a story that will not go away soon, even with the short collective memory for which the U.S.public is noted, and even with the perception we have, mistaken or not, about how business is done inMexico. The investigations and potential lawsuits will wend their way forward but Wal-Mart has an immediate problem: how to revive its reputation which was essentially snuffed out by one newspaper story. Unless there are very clear explanations that go beyond mere flim-flam, cut your losses Wal-Mart. Cooperate with investigations to ensure that they are completed rapidly. Develop your best explanations. Negotiate your fines for violating the Federal Corrupt Practices Act. Make restitution wherever it is required. Terminate those who were complicit. Get your house in order as quickly as you can.

 But this article is not about what to do now. It is about what should have been done. Wal-Mart’s story is as old as the hills. It is the same story as Richard Nixon and Watergate, Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, Enron, Goldman-Sachs. And on and on and on. It is the story of hubris. It is the story of deceit. It is the story of the ostrich.

 Faced with a calamitous issue, a powerful person, a powerful company, a powerful country is most likely still to believe that there is a good chance of getting away with something. Lie low and time will make the issue recede into history. Put a band aid on and no one will dare to pierce your impenetrable shell. What would have happened if Wal-Mart had entertained a genuine independent internal investigation when it had the opportunity, and made those findings known to the Justice Department and toMexico? There would have been a much smaller story. Wal-Mart would at least have been accused of being honorable. Its reputation for integrity would have been burnished. It would have paid a price but perhaps not as steep a price as it will now pay.

 Why don’t people get it? Because there is a gambler in all of us, even when the odds are poor. Is there a chance we can get away with something? Let’s give it a try. What do we have to lose? Ask Richard Nixon. Ask Bill Clinton. Ask all those who have tried to wheedle their way out of messes only to get caught. Ah but then again there is always that other guy, the guy who got away with it. We should follow him. He’s a smart guy. He knew the angles. If he could do it, we can too.  Right now things are calm. Let’s not rock the boat. But in the long run the straight-shooter almost always wins.

Crisis management is not only activated when a cris occurs. It begins prior to a crisis in order to avoid a crisis or lessen its severity. Preparation and right-thinking separate those companies and organizations from those that merely kick the can or determine to ignore or purposefully hide a potentially serious issue.

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THE YAHOO LESSON: LINE UP YOUR DUCKS AND CONTROL THE DIALOGUE

Posted in Anticipation, Business Crises of our own making, poor succession planning creates concern, succession planning avoids a crisis, YAHOO fires its top exec on September 8th, 2011 by mnayor

On September 6TH Yahoo fired its CEO Carol Bartz after 2 ½ years of lackluster performance.

The firing was done abruptly over the phone and Bartz immediately controlled the dialogue by emailing the story to all Yahoo employees. Yahoo announced that its current CFO, Tim Morse, would be interim CEO.

What’s wrong with this picture? Plenty!

First, as a very visible public company, you try to do things with class.

Second, before you take significant action, you have a plan. In this case, either a solid succession plan with a new CEO waiting in the wings; or a takeover or a restructuring or other dramatic announcement. This current action feels like it is adrift in the middle of nowhere, adding to the perception that Yahoo is essentially rudderless and is floundering.

Third, if all else fails, at least control the dialogue. Make the announcement, explain the need for the company to get back in the ball game, relate what it is it wants to accomplish, thank the fired CEO for her efforts on behalf of the Company, express a long-term vision and state you are looking forward to the future.

Although Yahoo’s Board is probably congratulating itself on the stock surge that resulted from the firing, that little boost may be short-lived. The fact is that Yahoo is behind the times and needs to play catch-up. It has failed to cater to the new digital world of social networks, video creation, mobile apps and smart phone screens. Once investors realize that Yahoo has to do more than fire someone, its stock price will settle back down. To take over, or be taken over, or mount a monumental internal surge – that is the question. An executive looking for an extraordinarily interesting challenge should not be impossible to find.

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DODGING THE-ALL-THE-EGGS-IN-ONE-BASKET-SYNDROME

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crises of our own making, Crisis Management Consulting, Crisis Management Planning, Diversification on January 13th, 2011 by mnayor

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will most likely cancel the $14.4 billion program to develop a Marine landing craft designed to navigate water and storm beaches. Gates’ decision represents a change in fighting strategy. Now that ships and landing craft can be hit by missiles from a range of distances it is a signal that this type of warfare may be relegated to the ash heap.

What should companies take away from this development? Easy. Doing work for the Federal Government can, no doubt, be rewarding, (even though highly frustrating; red tape can turn crimson and frustrations can escalate) but a business must be ever vigilant and conscious of the winds in Washington. Certainly many high level decisions make a great deal of sense. But others can be politically motivated, or motivated by nothing more than the need to squeeze the national budget. Whatever the reason, it behooves any company that is a government contractor, to always have an ear to the ground.

The Marine vehicle in question is being built by General Dynamics. Although the cancelled $14.4 billion program was to have been spread out over a number of years cancellation will certainly still be a blow. At the end of 2009 GD had sales of $32 billion. The Combat Systems Division alone in 2009 generated 9.6 billion in sales and the company had an overall profit of $3.7 billion. So putting the project in this proper perspective, it was not just loose change.

GD has a diversified operation. With over 90,000 employees worldwide, it does not just rely on the government for business. It has thriving Aerospace, Marine Systems and Information Technology and Systems divisions, with many commercial customers. Its Gulfstream brand of business jets is known worldwide.

The moral of the story is clear. While GD may be diversified enough to withstand the travails of cancelled programs and losses of billions of dollars in sales, not all businesses are as prepared. Crisis management is not just for the “now” when the crisis has struck and everyone is scrambling. It includes crisis planning. A way for executives to focus on this is to consider it an offshoot of long range planning. Where does the company want to be in five years? In ten? What are the company’s vulnerabilities? How do we soften the exposure?

By treating crisis management not as a something to deal with as a rarified event, but, rather, as a necessary corollary to a normal function of long range planning, you will be able to mitigate the losses that come from the cancellation of your very own amphibious landing craft project.

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