WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM THE JPMORGAN DEBACLE

Posted in analyze the problem, Business Crisis Management, Corporate Crisis Management, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Crisis Management Response, don't white wash the crisis, fix the problem, Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan Chase, problem employees, Taking Responsibility for actions of an organization or its employees, Throw an employee under the bus on May 23rd, 2012 by mnayor

The JPMorgan $2 billion debacle stunned me as it did everyone else. It was like catching the self-righteous little kid with the smoking slingshot in his hand.

Well, not quite. I got to thinking. Yes, it’s true that Jamie Dimon has this holier than thou attitude and perhaps it’s nice to see him knocked down a peg or two. But many crises are without question caused by those employees who you think you know – but don’t. Or caused by the hierarchy or the controls you’ve established but which really don’t work. You look out over your domain and deem it good, but there is always someone or some circumstance or some poor decision that puts you and your company in the hot spot.

 Yes, the buck stops here and the CEO should always take the rap (instead of throwing someone or a few  people under the bus and taking the $23 million), but that doesn’t mean the CEO can really plug every hole that springs a leak. It would require too many thumbs. Dimon was frank and honest, but he did forget to say it was on his watch and he accepted full responsibility. You can’t have everything. But, what do you do when your trusted employee or employees do something dumb, or worse.

 Several months ago I wrote about Charlie Sheen. I also wrote about Christian Dior’s John Galliano. For those who don’t recognize the names, suffice it to say that both of these guys gave their employers and themselves black eyes and heartburn. CBS and C.D. each acted fairly quickly and dumped its famous and talented employee, regardless of his value. They restructured. They went on and in a matter of a couple of weeks after their decisions, the crisis each faced disappeared.

 Crisis management calls for decisive action. That doesn’t mean just dumping a perpetrator. It means analyzing a situation to see if the organization continues to be vulnerable. It means identifying the basic problem and rectifying it. Do potential employees have to be tested? Drugs? Psychological testing? Do they have to be supervised more closely? Should they be cleared to give public statements? Do employment contracts have to be tightened up? Do the work environments have to be more closely supervised? Do supervisors have to have greater responsibility for the conduct of their departments? Do department managers and regional vice presidents have to be more hands on? Should they be required to know all the employees under them? Should the work environments be evaluated for potential risk? Are there checks and balances? Are there activities being conducted that are beyond the scope or the purposes of the business  or the established guidelines or policies of the company?

Crisis management should lead to problem solving not problem white-washing. JPMorgan Chase has to look well within itself to answer these types of questions. So does the rest of the banking industry. The crucial question that needs to be answered is whether the reins on the biggest banks should be tightened: re-institute Glass-Steagall? Put real teeth into the Volcker Rule? Something has got to give and the big boys should act like big boys. The financial fate of the nation depends on it and the right to massive profits is not justification  for behavior that jeopardizes the well being of the country.

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FAILURE TO ANTICIPATE: THE WALMART EXAMPLE

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crisis Management, corporate integrity, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Honesty and directness in dealing with a crisis, Wal-Mart on May 3rd, 2012 by mnayor

On April 22nd, 2012 The New York Times broke a huge story on Wal-Mart’s Walmex subsidiary. The subsidiary is alleged to have systematically engaged in bribery in order to grease the wheels of  its store expansion program in Mexico. Two of its most senior executives have been directly implicated in the scheme and the subsequent cover-up. The fallout has been dramatic including upcoming Congressional and Justice Department investigations and investigations within Mexico, a precipitous drop in Wal-Mart’s stock price, and perhaps worst of all, a huge black eye to WalMart’s reputation for integrity.

 This is a story that will not go away soon, even with the short collective memory for which the U.S.public is noted, and even with the perception we have, mistaken or not, about how business is done inMexico. The investigations and potential lawsuits will wend their way forward but Wal-Mart has an immediate problem: how to revive its reputation which was essentially snuffed out by one newspaper story. Unless there are very clear explanations that go beyond mere flim-flam, cut your losses Wal-Mart. Cooperate with investigations to ensure that they are completed rapidly. Develop your best explanations. Negotiate your fines for violating the Federal Corrupt Practices Act. Make restitution wherever it is required. Terminate those who were complicit. Get your house in order as quickly as you can.

 But this article is not about what to do now. It is about what should have been done. Wal-Mart’s story is as old as the hills. It is the same story as Richard Nixon and Watergate, Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, Enron, Goldman-Sachs. And on and on and on. It is the story of hubris. It is the story of deceit. It is the story of the ostrich.

 Faced with a calamitous issue, a powerful person, a powerful company, a powerful country is most likely still to believe that there is a good chance of getting away with something. Lie low and time will make the issue recede into history. Put a band aid on and no one will dare to pierce your impenetrable shell. What would have happened if Wal-Mart had entertained a genuine independent internal investigation when it had the opportunity, and made those findings known to the Justice Department and toMexico? There would have been a much smaller story. Wal-Mart would at least have been accused of being honorable. Its reputation for integrity would have been burnished. It would have paid a price but perhaps not as steep a price as it will now pay.

 Why don’t people get it? Because there is a gambler in all of us, even when the odds are poor. Is there a chance we can get away with something? Let’s give it a try. What do we have to lose? Ask Richard Nixon. Ask Bill Clinton. Ask all those who have tried to wheedle their way out of messes only to get caught. Ah but then again there is always that other guy, the guy who got away with it. We should follow him. He’s a smart guy. He knew the angles. If he could do it, we can too.  Right now things are calm. Let’s not rock the boat. But in the long run the straight-shooter almost always wins.

Crisis management is not only activated when a cris occurs. It begins prior to a crisis in order to avoid a crisis or lessen its severity. Preparation and right-thinking separate those companies and organizations from those that merely kick the can or determine to ignore or purposefully hide a potentially serious issue.

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DODGING THE-ALL-THE-EGGS-IN-ONE-BASKET-SYNDROME

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crises of our own making, Crisis Management Consulting, Crisis Management Planning, Diversification on January 13th, 2011 by mnayor

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will most likely cancel the $14.4 billion program to develop a Marine landing craft designed to navigate water and storm beaches. Gates’ decision represents a change in fighting strategy. Now that ships and landing craft can be hit by missiles from a range of distances it is a signal that this type of warfare may be relegated to the ash heap.

What should companies take away from this development? Easy. Doing work for the Federal Government can, no doubt, be rewarding, (even though highly frustrating; red tape can turn crimson and frustrations can escalate) but a business must be ever vigilant and conscious of the winds in Washington. Certainly many high level decisions make a great deal of sense. But others can be politically motivated, or motivated by nothing more than the need to squeeze the national budget. Whatever the reason, it behooves any company that is a government contractor, to always have an ear to the ground.

The Marine vehicle in question is being built by General Dynamics. Although the cancelled $14.4 billion program was to have been spread out over a number of years cancellation will certainly still be a blow. At the end of 2009 GD had sales of $32 billion. The Combat Systems Division alone in 2009 generated 9.6 billion in sales and the company had an overall profit of $3.7 billion. So putting the project in this proper perspective, it was not just loose change.

GD has a diversified operation. With over 90,000 employees worldwide, it does not just rely on the government for business. It has thriving Aerospace, Marine Systems and Information Technology and Systems divisions, with many commercial customers. Its Gulfstream brand of business jets is known worldwide.

The moral of the story is clear. While GD may be diversified enough to withstand the travails of cancelled programs and losses of billions of dollars in sales, not all businesses are as prepared. Crisis management is not just for the “now” when the crisis has struck and everyone is scrambling. It includes crisis planning. A way for executives to focus on this is to consider it an offshoot of long range planning. Where does the company want to be in five years? In ten? What are the company’s vulnerabilities? How do we soften the exposure?

By treating crisis management not as a something to deal with as a rarified event, but, rather, as a necessary corollary to a normal function of long range planning, you will be able to mitigate the losses that come from the cancellation of your very own amphibious landing craft project.

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ANTICIPATION

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Planning, Crisis Communication Response, Crisis Communication Training, Crisis Management Planning on September 3rd, 2010 by mnayor

This post is about crises that require that you and/or your organization be in the public eye. In a previous post the observation was made that you should try to control the dialogue, as long as you don’t overly rush and sacrifice accuracy. All that is true but in many cases you may have to open yourselves up to questions, and the questions may be hard ones. So not only is it important to craft your message honestly and pick your messanger carefully, but it is also important to ANTICIPATE.

That seems easy enough and many organizations do that but the method is usually very haphazard. A bunch of people get in a room and the leader says “what do you think They’ll ask?” And then the brainstorming begins and people feel obligated to spout something out. After an uncomfortable length of time when the perticipants have spent their energy, someone says “Ok, I think that does it” and that does do it.

Not good! First you should list your stakeholders and one by one list those issues in which each is primarily interested. Investors – the bottom line; employees - job security; customers – continuity of supply; suppliers – change orders and continued ability to pay. There are those in the organization who know the stakeholders best. Pull them into the room to tell you. Role-play. List the issues and develop the answers. Finally, brainstorm to develop everything and anything that might go wrong. Anticipate the worst. The crisis gets worse, competitors ponce, the news media tries to hang you out to dry. Make the list and try to develop the reaction. You won’t be able to anticipate every scenerio or have an answer for everything BUT the process will prepare you and get you close enough to most issues so you won’t be caught in the headlights.

Finally, the chief operating officer should certainly be your front-(wo)man. Nevertheless we all realize, and it is not expected, that the CEO is all-knowing. Mayor Bloomberg has a brilliant strategy of talking to reporters about key situations, giving the broad-brush information or account and then handing over the microphone to his deputy – the police commissioner, his financial chief, his environmental guru or whoever is the person with the handle on the situation. This has a dual-fold impact: the matter has the attention of the very top, and the organization has the expertise and knowledge to provide the public with detailed information. Oftentimes it may be necessary even for the deputy to surround himself with additional experts and rely on them to feed information or come forward and provide the additional information directly. That is why it is very good training to have your employees particpate in meetings and have some experience in speaking in front of a group. You never know when they will be needed.

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QUICK RESPONSE VERSUS INTELLIGENT RESPONSE

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Crisis Management Response on July 27th, 2010 by admin

A maxim in crisis management is that you should control the dialogue. It is better to leap out in front rather than be reactive to questions and probing which often leads to the deer caught in headilghts phenomenon.

What is not said quite so often is that a quick response must be an intelligent response that is backed up by facts and knowledge. Which brings us to the Obama Administration. Early in his term President Obama held a press conference and was asked why it took him a couple of days before he made a statement on AIG bonuses. He gave the CNN reporter an icy stare and stated that he liked to know what he was talking about before he made public statements. Bravo I thought.

Read more »

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BP’s TROUBLES

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Corporate Crisis Management, Crisis Communication Failures, Crisis Communication Implementation, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning on May 18th, 2010 by admin

When it rains, it pours. So many crises involving nature. Volcanic ash. Bubbling oil. I have very strong hopes that the earth doesn’t crack open. Disasters of this nature make one feel that protecting a corporate reputation is not all that important in the total scheme of things. But protecting a reputation is very important – as long as the entity being protected is worthy of the effort.

BP in general has manned-up. It has acknowledged its responsibility (at least in part). It has gone before the public almost daily it seems in order to give status reports. It is trying many different schemes to cap the oil gushing into the Gulf. Yet, it is the butt of jokes and is not coming off as a responsible corporate citizen. Something is lacking. Read more »

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THE PUBLIC FACE OF CRISIS MITIGATION

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Corporate Crisis Management, Crisis Communication Implementation, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Crisis Management Response on March 27th, 2010 by admin

Pre-crisis mitigation doesn’t have a public face. It is comprised of all the efforts and planning necessary to either avoid a crisis or mitigate its consequences when one occurs. Everything from identifying and buying the appropriate insurance to fire drills fall under this umbrella.

Post-crisis mitigation is an entirely different matter. The crisis has hit the fan and there is much work to do. Naturally the first item of business is confronting the crisis head on, dealing with the issue and taking corrective action. Equally as important is taking on the public. This is oftentimes not as easy as one would think. Very talented people can grapple with the identification of and the solutions to a crisis, yet are completely flummoxed by the requirements for dealing with the public. Read more »

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PLANNING FOR POST CRISIS MITIGATION

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Planning, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Crisis Management Response, Crisis Management Strategy on March 23rd, 2010 by admin
No one can anticipate exactly what kind of crisis may befall your organization. Nevertheless there are many things that can be done – let’s call them generic – that will extremely helpful if and when the day comes that you need to call out the troops. And that is precisely the first step.
Assemble a team. Naturally, you have to assemble people who are trustworthy, loyal and competent. You may find that certain employees fit the bill while others are doubtful. You are not limited to employees. You most likely have relied on the services of outside people – people who have been your organization’s kitchen cabinet – throughout the years. Lawyers, accountants, marketing and public relations people, former employees who have gone out on their own. Shake the tree and you’ll be surprised who can be helpful.
Next, prioritize your needs. Who are the technical people available to fix the most likely problems? Who are the ones most capable of immediate fact-finding? These are the people who need to be mobilized quickly in order to isolate and address the most immediate concerns. Who are the individuals who can set up a document management system, document the issues, preserve evidence, research and fact-find and make information available to the very top. Finally, who are those who will speak for the organization. A communications strategy is a must. Generally speaking there is one spokesperson, perhaps with a backup individual. Information from the technical people and the document management people have to flow to the communicators who must be fully informed. Legal specialists and public relations personnel round out the communications team.
Communications is the key to effective crisis management. Of course, an organization’s problems need to be solved. But just as important, the public needs to know what the problems are, and what you are doing about them. The day of “no comment” is over. In fact it is long gone. Whether it’s Toyota or the local public utility, communications strategy is largely the same. An organization must be quick or else others will set the agenda and you will always be on the defensive. An organization must be proactive otherwise it will always be reactive. Openness and honesty coupled with the most up-to-date facts constitute good communications strategy. Staying on message, taking bold action to protect the public or making its needs paramount generally rule the day, regardless of whether you have been totally successful. Best intentions and extraordinary efforts are very often held in high regard by the public, especially when communicated regularly, clearly and openly.
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DEALING WITH A CRISIS – BEFORE AND AFTER

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning on March 9th, 2010 by admin
A crisis is anything that creates an impediment to the success and perceived value of your organization.
 
We are all aware of certain obvious and well-known crises involving tainted, shoddy or defective products. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Your organization may be confronted with high profile litigation, an industry-wide government investigation, the resignation of a well-known executive, an environmental or natural disaster or a major internet failure. The list goes on – illegal employee activities, computer data loss, a walkout or a strike.
 
You and your colleagues can brainstorm the vulnerabilities of your organization and take steps to protect yourselves before the fact. Protection takes many forms and these are the nuts and bolts aspect of mitigation – taking steps to reduce physical loss; taking steps to anticipate and mitigate crises that have not yet ocurred. First, insurance: flood, fire, catastrophic, third party liability, product liability, key man insurance, officers and directors’ liability insurance. There is insurance for practically everything if you can afford it. Next, there are internal measures such as laboratory testing, and computer backup and file storage. An organization, whether a business, or a not-for-profit, must anticipate its soft spots and plan ahead. This is mitigation before the fact and lessens the impact of a crisis
 
Mitigation after the fact is a whole different animal. Yes, you will have to ramp up the IT people or your lab technicians, make alternate plans for business continuation. There may be alot of mop-up. But now you are faced with an additional problem: public perception. Are you a deer caught in headlights or are you in full charge and control. do you have a plan in place? Do you have a spokesperson? Do you know how to take responsibility and avoid legal pitfalls?
 
Post-crisis mitigation is essential to the long-term survival of your organization. Without well planned and well executed post-crisis mitigation some organizations have found that they cannot recoup lost ground and cannot reclaim their previous stature or standing, whether it be worldwide or local. It must be taken seriously. When executed well, post crisis mitigation can even enhance reputation and standing.
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DO IT NOW – DO IT LATER

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Business Crisis Management, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning on March 8th, 2010 by admin
Every business or organization has a choice. Anticipate what problems or crises may befall you in the future and have a ready plan – or punt. Oftentimes punting is the option chosen – either because the principals are clueless, or consciously because of time constraints or because the odds are so against lightning striking.
But lightning does strike, many times without warning. The most obvious example is a natural disaster. Speculate what may be the most likely cause of a natural disaster where you are located. Hurricanes, floods, avalanches, twisters. Are you potentially vulnerable? None are exactly your fault but you have to play the hand you are dealt. The first rule of crisis management is anticipate.
 
 
You don’t have to be the manufacture of Oxycontin, or Perrier or Tylenol. You could be a retailer on Main Street. Do you sell peanuts, or tomatoes, or asparagus, all of which have hit the headlines within the last two years because of contamination. Do you sell toys from China that are finished with beautiful lead paint? Anticipate. Are you selling perishable commodities? Are you importing product from third world countries? Do you have alternative sources of product?
A little anticipation can go a long way towards protecting your best interests. Conversely ignoring this step can leave you vulnerable. If you have a plan for a crisis that may never occur the worst and the best that may happen is that you will never need to implement it.
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