THE CASCADING DECLINE AT THE BBC

Posted in BBC, Corporate Crisis Management, Covering for the organization, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Response, Crisis Mitigation, fix the problem, Protecting the organization at any cost?, the effect of ignoring a problem on November 14th, 2012 by mnayor

Covering for the organization rarely works. Neither does the belief that an organization is so strong and respected that it exits on a level all its own.PennStateofficials found that out recently and now the BBC is suffering from the same ill-advised mentality. Whistle-blowing is a separate but related topic but the concerted effort of many in positions of power at an organization to hide something or sweep it under the rug deserves special attention.

 

For many years a popular, long-time host at BBC, Jimmy Savile, was suspected of sexually abusing young people, sometimes even at the premises of the BBC. The Company recently came under blistering attack when it was learned that an investigation of Savile had been cancelled by the editor of BBC’s Newsnight program last year. Newsnight is an important current affairs program of the BBC. Mark Thompson, the BBC’s Director General until last month (and who is destined to join the New York Times shortly) claims to have had no knowledge of the accusations against Savile although there were many opportunities to delve into the matter if he chose to do so.

 

Within the last week and in a matter of weeks since Thompson’s departure, his successor, George Entwistle, resigned because of another flap, again involving Newsnight, which wrongly implicated a Conservative Party politician in a pedophile scandal inWales. And just yesterday the BBC’s Director of News, Helen Boaden and her deputy, Stephen Mitchell announced that they have “stepped aside”.

 

The upshot is that there is turmoil at the BBC. There is a lack of control and the Chairman of the BBC Trust has acknowledged that the organization is in a ghastly mess and in need of a thorough overhaul.

 

How does any organization get itself into this type of crisis and what types of crisis management are called for? First, hubris plays a significant role. When an organization attains a stratospheric reputation such as that of the BBC, those who personify it not only begin to believe in its infallibility but also in their own. Heightened reputations beget dizzying overconfidence. Secondly, there is a tendency of employees, whether they be worker bees or top management to put their employer above all else. Not many people want to be held responsible for the decline or unraveling of an organization. Most want to be team players, no matter what they know and no matter what they really think about their place of work.

 

Crisis management calls for continual checks and balances. An organization cannot continue to coast, as many do, on old and outdated reputations. It is incumbent on top management, and lower levels in turn, to clarify lines of responsibility and authority, to define the values of the organization, to impose clear lines of accountability and to review regularly issues that arise. Often, top management wishes to be insulated from bad decisions already made, and hard decisions that need to be made, even with the knowledge that, more often than not, the buck stops with them and they may be the sacrificial lambs regardless.

Crisis management does not just mean planning to avoid a crisis if possible. Nor does it just mean managing a crisis once it hits. It also means taking steps to mitigate a crisis in the works. A CEO and his/her lieutenants are charged with monitoring the ship as a captain of a vessel or plane would. Rectifying what is wrong is a vital part of the job. Time does not absorb and dissolve a bad decision. It only heightens the culpability of the parties who either made no attempt to rectify it or tried to white-wash it. This is a hard lesson for people such as the former President of Penn State and the late Joe Paterno. It is a hard lesson for the former and current management of the BBC.

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GO FOR THE LOW MAN ON THE TOTEM POLE

Posted in Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Honesty and directness in dealing with a crisis, Penn State, Protecting the organization at any cost?, Sacrifice the Little Guy, Throw an employee under the bus, Uncategorized on November 19th, 2011 by mnayor

(Or What I learned from Abu Ghraib)

Watching TV commentary and reading newspaper and internet accounts of the awful Penn State story, I am puzzled. Yes, there has been some effort to uncover what occurred, but very little in the way of reporting why the sexual abuse lasted so long, with so many people in authority knowing about it. And yes, Joe Paterno was fired and two other officials at the University indicted for perjury. But very little has been made of the responsibilities these people had, except for one person.

I’m not anti Joe Paterno. He’s probably a great guy and obviously a great coach. However, I have seen comments in defense of Joe that he had done what he was legally required to do. Not a very high bar for sure. What I am against is shining a spotlight on the low man on the totem pole. Throw him or her under the bus. The reputations of the organization itself and its various chiefs are much more important to preserve than that of the little guy who nobody ever heard of. Among reputable high-minded individuals, it puzzles me indeed that reputation preservation always trumps honesty – especially when honesty would do more to preserve reputations than buck passing.

So, who is that one person who is getting all the attention? Mike McQueary, who witnessed Jerry Sandusky in the showers with a boy, was a 28 years old graduate assistant at the University. Granted he wasn’t a youngster but he certainly wasn’t a seasoned member of the staff. There were certainly older and more entrenched members of the Penn State coaching staff. In fact, everyone else must have been an authority figure to him. Not easy to tell someone older and more powerful than you to cease and desist. In a perfect world yes Mike McQuaery might have stopped the actions of Sandusky and called the police. In a more realistic world Mike McQueary was brave enough to report the incident to Joe Paterno. A lesser human being might have forgotten what he had seen. Instead we read headlines like McQueary Action Drags Penn State to Shame. Every accusation that has been leveled at McQueary can be leveled at Joe and everyone else on up the line. What we have is clearly an attempt to scapegoat a very important matter instead of confronting and dealing with it head on.

You can hear on the sidelines of any Penn State game coaches yelling frantically to players to MAN UP. Penn State, heed your own advice.

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