J&J: IT’S ABOUT TIME OR MORE OF THE SAME

Posted in a ggod reputation guarantees long term profits, Business Crises We Create, cheating the public, Corporate Crisis Management, corporate integrity, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Response, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Hurting customers, J&J, Johnson & Johnson, Respect your customers, Taking Responsibility for actions of an organization or its employees, when the bottom line is more important than your customers, William Weldon on February 22nd, 2012 by mnayor

 In October of 2010 I highlighted many of the difficulties Johnson & Johnson had been going through since the early part of the decade, from tens of millions of dollars to settle claims against its product Ortho Evra, to product recalls including children’s Tylenol and contact lenses. Other telling issues involved a wrongful termination suit by a whistle blower and a resignation by a senior executive whose conscience would not allow him to remain at J&J knowing what he knew about Ortho Evra.

My conclusion was simply that J&J’s management had veered way off course and had sullied the reputation of one ofAmerica’s greatest corporations, one that was known and respected for its integrity and honesty. I ended with an expression of hope that the lessons learned would set management on the right course once again.

 This was not to be. Just this past week the press reported that J&J took a year to recall a version of its artificial hip after the FDA refused in 2009 to approve it because of its high rate of failures. The device was recalled in 2010, and J&J maintained until that time that the device was safe and its own studies refuted the allegations of professionals. J&J continued to market the hip in Europe and other overseas countries until the recall and sold another version of its hip that didn’t need safety approval in theU.S., even though the hip socket cup, which the FDA found to be flawed, was the same in both products.

 It is interesting to track the timeline of most of J&J’s recent woes to the timeline of William C. Weldon’s tenure as chief executive. Whether directly attributable to Weldon’s misfeasance or malfeasance is not the issue. The torrent of missteps, mistakes,  dishonesty, deception and manipulation has occurred on his watch. The least that can be said without pointing a finger directly at him is that he failed miserably to instill a sense of integrity within the company, a sense of integrity that transcends the needs of the short-term bottom line. So many executives foolishly sit at their desks with blinders on. Weldon and his followers allowed a culture to fester within their walls that calls for the good of the company to transcend the good of the public.

 No executive worth his title would allow the disintegration that has taken place at J&J. Thankfully, William Weldon will step down in April of this year although he will remain as chairman. Alex Gorsky will be the new CEO. Has the Board done the Company, its shareholders and the public a major disservice? Gorsky is cut from the same cloth as Weldon. They both cut their teeth in sales and both are sensitive to the bottom line and enhancing it above all else.  Hopefully Gorsky will recognize the need to build trust, and instill honor from which J&J can once again earn the widespread respect of the public. Build it and they will come. With that will come the financial success that Weldon’s crew tried to obtain on the cheap. If Gorsky has not learned from past mistakes, expect more of the same from J&J. We will all be witness to the transformation of a great American company into just another self-serving medical conglomerate that feeds off the public.

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NETFLIX REDUX

Posted in competitive advantage, Crisis Management, Gauge Your Competition, NETFLIX, Respect your customers, You Don't Have a Monopoly on October 27th, 2011 by mnayor

Those fickle consumers! After being presented with a whopping monthly price increase of 60%, 800,000 U.S. subscribers bailed on Netflix in the third quarter of this year. And the company’s stock tanked as a result. At the close of business Monday October 24th the Company’s stock was at 119. By Tuesday morning it was at 75 and currently hovers at 80. In July it was $300. This, while the company has negotiated a potentially great deal with Dreamworks Animation and posted third quarter earnings that rose an impressive 65% from $38 million to $62.5 million. What does this say about investor confidence?

True, the Company has admitted candidly to shareholders that it moved too quickly and dramatically to raise prices although it has emphasized that the new prices are where they have to be in the longer term. But, there is a bit of defiance in between the lines. Interviewed by The New York Times for its October 23rd Magazine Section, Reed Hastings, CEO of Netflix observes that when Netflix started its stock price was $7.50 and it had a million subscribers and it is a mistake to measure everything by what happened recently. Fair enough.

But there seems to be a failure to recognize the obvious. Competition not only looms in the wings. It’s right in Netflix’s face. Confidence is good. Over-confidence can be dangerous. Hastings fails to recognize that Netflix does not have any special competitive advantage in its industry. Yes, it clobbered Blockbuster and yes it got a good jump on internet streaming. However, here’s what is competing with Netflix, now and in the future: cable networks, Direct TV, Dish, Hulu (currently being courted by Google and Amazon), Redbox, and that old stand-by Blockbuster which certainly sees an opportunity to jump back into the game big-time.

Netflix no longer has a monopoly on a product or an idea. Thus it must now compete on service and price. Unless it discovers a new method of delivery or obtains a lock on new products, it will have to provide a superior product at a fair price if it wishes to continue to distinguish itself from its competitors. Which may mean its heyday is over. And that’s the lesson all businesses can take away from the Netflix experience. Better to compete like you have competitors breathing down your neck rather than act like you are the kingpin to whom all customers shall pay homage.

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