SONY’S RESPONSIBILITY FOR CYBER ATTACKS

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crises Communication, Crisis Communication Implementation, Crisis Communication Response, Cyber Attacks, negative publicity, Responsibility for date losses, Sony on May 22nd, 2011 by mnayor

Sony has been raked over the coals these last few weeks. Has there been just cause? And has Sony exercised good crisis management and crisis communication skills?

Between April 17 and April 19th the Sony PlayStation Network and the Company’s Qriocity service which streams video to Sony televisions and Blu-ray devices were hacked and knocked offline. Besides knocking out service, unauthorized persons obtained access to personal information including credit card numbers. An estimated 77 million PlayStation users and 12 million of their credit cards were affected, plus 24 million Sony Online Entertainment customers and over 10,000 of their cards. The services have just recently come back on line (Japan itself is an exception because the government is not yet sure they is secure) as of approximately May 14th.

There are two main issues that have gotten the public very agitated. First, did the Company handle its communications well? It took almost a week to publicly acknowledge the attacks and advise its customers that credit card information could have been compromised. This length of delay surely provided hackers with a large window of opportunity to utilize the information it had mined to the obvious detriment of millions of customers.

One of the basic tenants of crisis communication is to act quickly and have as much control of the dialogue as possible. The basic problem was evident, even if a great deal of operational research had to be done to identify the extent of the damage. The first goal should have been to minimize the vulnerability of its customers through immediate notification. By delaying, Sony allowed speculation to build up and therefore it positioned itself defensively, instead of taking vigorous proactive steps.

The other communications gaff came directly from Sony’s CEO, Howard Stringer. In a discussion with reporters on May 17th, he defended the actions of Sony when asked why it took almost a week to notify customers. He observed that the Company reported quickly, noted that many companies don’t report these breaches at all or only after a month, and then said “you’re telling me my week wasn’t fast enough”. This sounds a bit defensive and imperious for a CEO. Most customers would probably disagree with him, especially those whose credit cards could have used by the hackers, or those whose personal information may now be used for identity theft purposes.

The second main issue is operational. Sony must quickly tighten its security and provide safe and secure networks for its customers. The U.S. Congress and the New York Attorney general almost immediately jumped on the bandwagon to “investigate” this technological lapse, but hopefully these actions will not drain efforts away from identifying vulnerabilities and making data protection paramount. Customers need to be confident of Sony’s ability to protect them. Otherwise, it will lose out big time to Microsoft and Nintendo. That should be motivation enough to make Sony create one of the most secure networks available out there in cyberspace.

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JOHNSON & JOHNSON: CRISIS MANAGEMENT IN FREE-FALL

Posted in Business Crisis Management, Crisis Communication Failures, Crisis Communication Response, Liability Communications on October 5th, 2010 by mnayor

 The Today show on September 21st dusted off a fairly old story. Ortho Evra, a birth control patch introduced in 2002 and produced by J&J subsidiary Ortho McNeil was in the news again. Since the time of its introduction the patch has been the subject of thousands of court complaints. The product allegedly has the effect of causing deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolisms, heart attacks, strokes and death, all stemming from the fact that it can deliver twice as much estrogen to the body as regular birth control pills. J&J has received years of bad press about this subject. No claim has ever gone to trial and J&J continues settlements that total many tens of millions of dollars.

 The Today show reported that it had recently uncovered a 2005 resignation letter from a former J&J vice president saying that he could not remain in his position knowing the high levels of estrogen delivered by the product. The show also reported that another former vice president was suing the Company for wrongful termination based on his whistle-blowing efforts even before the product was introduced to the public.

 Now switch gears to J&J’s non-prescription products. Over the last year, the Company has gone through a slew of product recalls, including infants’ and children’s Tylenol, for reasons including contamination and the presence of foreign matter. The Company also conducted what is termed a “phantom” recall of Motrin by hiring a third party to buy up the product on store shelves in order to avoid adverse publicity. J&J maintains that it did so under an agreement with the Food and Drug Administration. The House of Representatives investigated the recalls, and questioned the alleged agreement with FDA when it heard CEO William Weldon at the end of September. Weldon acknowledged at the hearing that J&J had let the public down by not maintaining its high standards. An F.D.A. official testified that the Company had an inadequate quality system at a number of its facilities. One lawmaker declared that J&J’s failures would mar its reputation for years.

 J&J’s 1982 handling of the Tylenol scare is often cited as the quintessential example of crisis management in modern corporate history. Back then cyanide had been found in bottles of Tylenol in the Chicago area. J&J immediately issued public warnings, called a product recall, created tamper-proof packaging, and before long was fully back in business. The Company was up-front and willing to bite the bullet in the best interests of the public. Unfortunately that does not appear to be the philosophy today.

J&J’s website states that “The values that guide our decision making are spelled out in Our Credo. Put simply, Our Credo challenges us to put the needs and well-being of the people we serve first.” Maybe so, but it appears as if a new breed of management has taken the reins at J&J – new cutting -edge types whose sole concentration is on the bottom line. Yet it might be this competence and cool business efficiency that will have the effect of undermining the extraordinary 120 year old reputation of this venerable institution. The abilities of current management must be tempered with sensitivity and responsibility to the public in order to salvage and maintain the invaluable good will of one of America’s great corporations. Hopefully the lessons learned will again set management on the right course.

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APOLOGIES, APOLOGIES , APOLOGIES

Posted in Crisis Communication Response, Crisis Management Response on July 27th, 2010 by admin

Has our country gotten apology slap-happy?

It seems that no matter what, we always want to see more twisting in the wind, whether it’s Tiger Woods, BP or anything or anyone in between. An apology is either not sincere enough, not-heart-felt, not good enough, doesn’t admit enough, doesn’t say what we want to hear. Are we spending more time on form over substance? The bottom line in most cases: we want the problem fixed or we want the situation remedied. Read more »

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