PRE-CRISIS MANAGEMENT

Posted in Anticipation, CRISIS MANAGEMENT STARTS WITH PLANNING, Ethics and Crisis Management, PRE-CRISIS PLANNING on September 12th, 2012 by mnayor

 The term crisis management itself is enough to send executives and managers scurrying back to their desks, burying their heads in papers so they can be overlooked. If one is tapped to head a pre-crisis management team, it’s like being the designated fire marshal for your floor in the building. If you are appointed to manage a post-crisis event, you may have everything to lose and nothing to gain. After all you may be in the cross hairs of public opinion and totally distracted from your regular role in sales, marketing, advertising, or finance.

 

But crisis management is a vital function. It should be recognized as such by the CEO of any organization and communicated down the chain. Any one event, whether due to totally external factors or self created, a crisis can set an organization back years or deep six it, if not handled properly. Handling that one event may well far outweigh for example the importance of the market roll-out of a new product.

 

Pre-crisis management is preventative in nature. It helps you avoid a crisis. It also prepares you for handling a crisis in the event one occurs.

 

Post crisis management implements the plan you have prepared in anticipation of a crisis occurring.

 

So, what is a crisis. It can be any event or circumstance that has the potential for negatively impacting your organization whether it is damage to reputation, operations, markets, or products. Tainted, shoddy or defective products. High profile litigation. A government investigation. The resignation of a key officer. An environmental or natural disaster. n internet failure. Illegal employee activities. Computer data loss. A walkout or strike. The list goes on

 

The spill-over effect is the negative impact the event will have on your stakeholders – your customers, your suppliers, investors, employees, government officials, the public at large, the media. Major crises happen all the time. We have seen several  recently and they are not pretty.PennStateof course, Wal-Mart’s Mexican subsidiary bribery story, Netflix’s pricing fiasco, Olympus Corporation’s cooked books, J&J’s poor handling of product recalls. These stories and many more underscore the necessity for pre-crisis management.

 

Of course we are not all Wal-Mart or Johnson & Johnson.  But the owner of the local retail toy store has as much to gain from crisis management as the big boys. Bad press, damaged relationships, investor confidence, employee morale, supplier cut-offs, civil and criminal liability – none of these things happen only to giant institutions.

 

How to start. It’s easy. Brainstorm. No one can anticipate an exact crisis but we can all speculate as to what our organizations may be vulnerable. List these vulnerabilities and what you can do about them. Example: you are a farmer and need to protect yourself against weather-related events. Insurance coverage, smudge pots, protective coverings etc. may be your answer. Example: your supplier of critical components has had problems. Begin identifying and ordering from alternative sources of supply, vertical integration, overseas sources etc. may be your answer. Example: you produce or distribute products for human consumption. Check your sources for utmost reliability, third party liability insurance, random quality checks.

 

Other potential solutions to problems: alternate transportation sources, duplicate bookkeeping and records backup, key man insurance, family succession planning. All these actions, if circumstances warrant, can be extremely helpful in avoiding you being caught unaware.

 

Next, assemble a team, a core group made up of the CEO, your PR people and legal counsel. Identify those managers or employees who have the best in-depth knowledge and are capable of attacking a problem in their respective areas. Identify those managers and employees who are capable of succinctly explaining issues to top management and/or to the public. Assemble this team and assign roles. Ensure that you have an organized document management system in place that preserves data and information and be ready for fact finding. Develop a communications strategy which includes assigning responsibility for communication content and approval, and assigning the role of spokesperson. Recognize the need for different messages for different stakeholders. develop responses for different media, from press releases, on air responses and social media.

 

Don’t think you can handle everything in-house. Your attorney, your public relations consultant or those who you rely on for sage advice will come in handy. Outsiders have a broader perspective than you may have and can assist to anticipate problems, develop a plan, assist in investigations and document management, assess any legal exposure and help prepare public statements.

 

One observation I personally believe to be of utmost importance.  If you look at some of the highly publicized crises of the day, many stem from lax ethics. Enhancing the bottom line has many times replaced the goal of doing the right thing, often at the expense of customers. Increasing short term profits may make a hero out of someone today but the actions taken to accomplish this may have severe repercussions to an organization tomorrow. A CEO can pressure everyone to redouble their efforts to increase revenues and profits and let employees find their own path or a CEO can communicate the need for high ethical standards which in the long run, will bear more fruit and allow everyone to come to work the next day. Crisis management especially crisis planning is a crucial effort to manage those events that have slipped by you. The worst and the best that can happen is that you will never have to implement your plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

ANTICIPATION

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Planning, Crisis Communication Response, Crisis Communication Training, Crisis Management Planning on September 3rd, 2010 by mnayor

This post is about crises that require that you and/or your organization be in the public eye. In a previous post the observation was made that you should try to control the dialogue, as long as you don’t overly rush and sacrifice accuracy. All that is true but in many cases you may have to open yourselves up to questions, and the questions may be hard ones. So not only is it important to craft your message honestly and pick your messanger carefully, but it is also important to ANTICIPATE.

That seems easy enough and many organizations do that but the method is usually very haphazard. A bunch of people get in a room and the leader says “what do you think They’ll ask?” And then the brainstorming begins and people feel obligated to spout something out. After an uncomfortable length of time when the perticipants have spent their energy, someone says “Ok, I think that does it” and that does do it.

Not good! First you should list your stakeholders and one by one list those issues in which each is primarily interested. Investors – the bottom line; employees - job security; customers – continuity of supply; suppliers – change orders and continued ability to pay. There are those in the organization who know the stakeholders best. Pull them into the room to tell you. Role-play. List the issues and develop the answers. Finally, brainstorm to develop everything and anything that might go wrong. Anticipate the worst. The crisis gets worse, competitors ponce, the news media tries to hang you out to dry. Make the list and try to develop the reaction. You won’t be able to anticipate every scenerio or have an answer for everything BUT the process will prepare you and get you close enough to most issues so you won’t be caught in the headlights.

Finally, the chief operating officer should certainly be your front-(wo)man. Nevertheless we all realize, and it is not expected, that the CEO is all-knowing. Mayor Bloomberg has a brilliant strategy of talking to reporters about key situations, giving the broad-brush information or account and then handing over the microphone to his deputy – the police commissioner, his financial chief, his environmental guru or whoever is the person with the handle on the situation. This has a dual-fold impact: the matter has the attention of the very top, and the organization has the expertise and knowledge to provide the public with detailed information. Oftentimes it may be necessary even for the deputy to surround himself with additional experts and rely on them to feed information or come forward and provide the additional information directly. That is why it is very good training to have your employees particpate in meetings and have some experience in speaking in front of a group. You never know when they will be needed.

Tags: , , , ,

PLANNING FOR POST CRISIS MITIGATION

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Planning, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning, Crisis Management Response, Crisis Management Strategy on March 23rd, 2010 by admin
No one can anticipate exactly what kind of crisis may befall your organization. Nevertheless there are many things that can be done – let’s call them generic – that will extremely helpful if and when the day comes that you need to call out the troops. And that is precisely the first step.
Assemble a team. Naturally, you have to assemble people who are trustworthy, loyal and competent. You may find that certain employees fit the bill while others are doubtful. You are not limited to employees. You most likely have relied on the services of outside people – people who have been your organization’s kitchen cabinet – throughout the years. Lawyers, accountants, marketing and public relations people, former employees who have gone out on their own. Shake the tree and you’ll be surprised who can be helpful.
Next, prioritize your needs. Who are the technical people available to fix the most likely problems? Who are the ones most capable of immediate fact-finding? These are the people who need to be mobilized quickly in order to isolate and address the most immediate concerns. Who are the individuals who can set up a document management system, document the issues, preserve evidence, research and fact-find and make information available to the very top. Finally, who are those who will speak for the organization. A communications strategy is a must. Generally speaking there is one spokesperson, perhaps with a backup individual. Information from the technical people and the document management people have to flow to the communicators who must be fully informed. Legal specialists and public relations personnel round out the communications team.
Communications is the key to effective crisis management. Of course, an organization’s problems need to be solved. But just as important, the public needs to know what the problems are, and what you are doing about them. The day of “no comment” is over. In fact it is long gone. Whether it’s Toyota or the local public utility, communications strategy is largely the same. An organization must be quick or else others will set the agenda and you will always be on the defensive. An organization must be proactive otherwise it will always be reactive. Openness and honesty coupled with the most up-to-date facts constitute good communications strategy. Staying on message, taking bold action to protect the public or making its needs paramount generally rule the day, regardless of whether you have been totally successful. Best intentions and extraordinary efforts are very often held in high regard by the public, especially when communicated regularly, clearly and openly.
Tags: , , , ,

DEALING WITH A CRISIS – BEFORE AND AFTER

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning on March 9th, 2010 by admin
A crisis is anything that creates an impediment to the success and perceived value of your organization.
 
We are all aware of certain obvious and well-known crises involving tainted, shoddy or defective products. But that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Your organization may be confronted with high profile litigation, an industry-wide government investigation, the resignation of a well-known executive, an environmental or natural disaster or a major internet failure. The list goes on – illegal employee activities, computer data loss, a walkout or a strike.
 
You and your colleagues can brainstorm the vulnerabilities of your organization and take steps to protect yourselves before the fact. Protection takes many forms and these are the nuts and bolts aspect of mitigation – taking steps to reduce physical loss; taking steps to anticipate and mitigate crises that have not yet ocurred. First, insurance: flood, fire, catastrophic, third party liability, product liability, key man insurance, officers and directors’ liability insurance. There is insurance for practically everything if you can afford it. Next, there are internal measures such as laboratory testing, and computer backup and file storage. An organization, whether a business, or a not-for-profit, must anticipate its soft spots and plan ahead. This is mitigation before the fact and lessens the impact of a crisis
 
Mitigation after the fact is a whole different animal. Yes, you will have to ramp up the IT people or your lab technicians, make alternate plans for business continuation. There may be alot of mop-up. But now you are faced with an additional problem: public perception. Are you a deer caught in headlights or are you in full charge and control. do you have a plan in place? Do you have a spokesperson? Do you know how to take responsibility and avoid legal pitfalls?
 
Post-crisis mitigation is essential to the long-term survival of your organization. Without well planned and well executed post-crisis mitigation some organizations have found that they cannot recoup lost ground and cannot reclaim their previous stature or standing, whether it be worldwide or local. It must be taken seriously. When executed well, post crisis mitigation can even enhance reputation and standing.
Tags: , ,

DO IT NOW – DO IT LATER

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Business Crisis Management, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Planning on March 8th, 2010 by admin
Every business or organization has a choice. Anticipate what problems or crises may befall you in the future and have a ready plan – or punt. Oftentimes punting is the option chosen – either because the principals are clueless, or consciously because of time constraints or because the odds are so against lightning striking.
But lightning does strike, many times without warning. The most obvious example is a natural disaster. Speculate what may be the most likely cause of a natural disaster where you are located. Hurricanes, floods, avalanches, twisters. Are you potentially vulnerable? None are exactly your fault but you have to play the hand you are dealt. The first rule of crisis management is anticipate.
 
 
You don’t have to be the manufacture of Oxycontin, or Perrier or Tylenol. You could be a retailer on Main Street. Do you sell peanuts, or tomatoes, or asparagus, all of which have hit the headlines within the last two years because of contamination. Do you sell toys from China that are finished with beautiful lead paint? Anticipate. Are you selling perishable commodities? Are you importing product from third world countries? Do you have alternative sources of product?
A little anticipation can go a long way towards protecting your best interests. Conversely ignoring this step can leave you vulnerable. If you have a plan for a crisis that may never occur the worst and the best that may happen is that you will never need to implement it.
Tags: , , ,
Blog WebMastered by All in One Webmaster.