PENN STATE AND OLYMPUS CORP.: WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON

Posted in Crisis Communication Response, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Olympus Corp., Penn State, reputation management, Sacrifice the Little Guy, Taking Responsibility for actions of an organization or its employees on November 19th, 2011 by mnayor

Two scandals this week couldn’t seem more different. One involves allegations of pedophilia sex at a university, Penn State and the other financial shenanigans at a large Japanese corporation, Olympus Corp. Most in the public relations field would exclaim that both matters require “crisis management”, but there is a closer commonality than that. We have to look at the underlying cause of these scandals to see what they share in common.

In many crisis situations the crisis comes about by an outside force or a factor beyond an organization’s control or ability to anticipate. There are, of course, natural disasters. There can be strikes, new legislation, unexpected competition, employee dishonesty, product contamination and the list goes on. Most organizations are “forgiven” or the matter is soon forgotten if the issue is dealt with promptly. Even the BP Gulf oil spill has receded from our memories because the company dealt with the calamity, no matter how ineptly.

But certain “crises” are either created or exacerbated by an organization itself. There are many participants, willing or scared or just amoral who put the organization first. These types of issues should not be looked upon as crises but as severe ethical failures. Oftentimes the principal players either feel they have no choice, or stick their collective heads in the sand or worst of all, feel they won’t be caught and therefore have no compunction about doing what they see as best for the organization. This is what Penn State and Olympus have in common –people have done something unconscionable and others who know about it do nothing or as little as possible. No one wants to be a whistle blower. Willingly or unwillingly, everyone wants to be a loyal team player.

From politicians to entertainers to corporate CEO’s, there is an ever-growing tendency to believe “I can get away with it”, or “it’s not my problem”, or “let’s not rock the boat” or “I’m not going to stick my neck out”.

These days the words “ethics” and “morals” are used interchangeably Elijah Weber described the difference this way:

“Morals, quite simply, are beliefs about right and wrong conduct….They do not require reason, consistency, or thorough analysis in their initial shaping or practical application…. I can believe that lying is wrong because my grandmother told me it was, and that is what I believe. No further justification is required. Ethics, on the other hand, is a reason based cumulative system of moral decision making. It is built upon one or a few basic principles and requires that we be thorough, honest, and comprehensive in making statements about right and wrong. Ethics is about building the kind of world we want to live in, and developing a consistent process by which to achieve this. Ethics is an advanced expression of morality.”

I like this analysis of ethics: a few basic principles that require that we be thorough, honest, and comprehensive in making statements about right and wrong. It is about building the kind of world we want to live in…Do we wish to live in a world where we turn a blind eye to child sexual abuse? Do we want to turn a blind eye to Ponzi schemes and product failings and financial manipulations built on sand that will have severe consequences to investors, employees, and consumers? I think not.
No one is naive enough to think that every company, every charitable organization, every university will adhere to the straight and narrow but wouldn’t it be refreshing if we could count on ethical behavior most of the time. Wouldn’t it also be nice if every honest whistle blower who performed a public service wasn’t maligned and attacked as a weasel or turn-coat? Wouldn’t it be interesting if every organization that breached ethical norms, faced its predicament responsibly Since it is not possible to have a perfect world, shouldn’t we at least shine a spotlight on those who perpetuate bad conduct no matter how revered, competent and respected they may have been?

I fear that the opposite usually occurs. The whistleblower is a turncoat. The person who tried to do the right thing didn’t do enough. The head honcho and the organization are protected as best as possible. The little guy gets thrown under the bus.

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THE SKINNY ON WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Crisis Communication Failures, Crisis Management, Jenny Craig ranked first, poor reaction to bad press, Slim Fast ranked high, THE RHODELL GROUP, weight loss programs, Weight Watchers reaction to Consumer Reports on May 11th, 2011 by mnayor

Whoa! The news is in. According to Consumer Reports, Jenny Craig is the winner. Based on factors such as weight loss and drop-out rates, Jenny left its competitors in the dust. Slim Fast came in second and Weight Watchers third.

Talk about being blind-sided and needing a crisis plan. This is certainly a classic case in point.

Crisis planning is sometimes looked upon by companies as seriously as a fire drill – and by employees as akin to root canal work. We don’t have the time! I could be doing something that affects the bottom line, not this stuff! The excuses go on and on. But brainstorming potential crises is the starting point and competitive reviews ranks high on the list.

So it was surprising to read the reaction of Weight Watchers. There is rarely room for sour grapes in responses to less-than-favorable news. Word-smithing is the ability to get your messages and facts across clearly without sounding like you are whining. Weight Watchers failed.

Instead of exclaiming that it was disappointed that Consumer Reports left certain key points of the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association) study “were left unsaid” the Company’s statement should have begun with what it believes its program does well: WW advocates and teaches how to live in the real world – people learn to make smart choices etc. It should then have stressed how proud it is of its long history, its success in changing the lives of countless individuals. It should have stated that everyone should recognize that most people cannot afford the luxury of having food prepared for them daily and its program is a much more realistic approach to weight loss. Finally it should have underscored that clinical data on its new PointsPlus Program will be published shortly, that it looks forward to the conclusions of the data and are confident that this study, along with over 60 other WW studies will once again show the extraordinary effectiveness and success of the Weight Watchers program for millions of people.

The Consumers Report story was an opportunity for WW to blow its horn. The media wanted to hear what it had to say. Instead they just blew it. Slim-Fast, which actually came in second with its snack bars and shakes, capitalized on the story. It was “thrilled to once again be ranked among the top U.S. weight loss plans evaluated by Consumer Reports”. It then went on to describe its 3-2-1 Plan and invited people to check them out on Facebook and website. Slim-Fast believes in itself.

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CHRISTIAN DIOR – MEET CHARLIE SHEEN

Posted in Charlie Sheen, Christian Dior, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Consulting, managing your reputation in good times as well as bad, negative publicity, problem employees, reputation management, THE RHODELL GROUP on May 11th, 2011 by mnayor

Ah, to be blessed with an employee as talented as John Galliano. The problem is the more creative and (in)famous an employee is, the larger his head becomes and the more difficult it is for a company to reign in the beast.

What to do with an uncontrollable employee who is as much or more in the limelight as the company itself. The first rule of thumb is that the COMPANY is more important in the scheme of things than the employee (unless they are one and the same. See Martha Stewart). Certainly a Company can turn a blind eye to little things if those things do not really reflect poorly on the Company. After all you can’t go around canning every employee who gets a speeding ticket.

Nevertheless, there are very visible employees who act out in public and when such actions reflect poorly on the Company, emphatic, decisive action must be taken. The public for the most part applauded the actions of Christian Dior. John Galliano, its head designer, was canned on February 28th for making racist and anti-Semitic remarks caught on video. But prior to that, on February 25th, he had been suspended (pending the results of an inquiry into the matter) for assaulting a couple in a Paris bar, using similar anti-Semitic and racial slurs.

Now, here’s the rub. Did it take a venomous and outrageous video to get Dior to take its final action or was Dior at that point already. Perhaps the Company had already chosen the guillotine for Galliano. And if so, good for them. But the small time lapse brings up the real issue which should count as a lesson for most companies.

Most corporate executives when faced with a crisis like the Galliano affair want to accomplish two things: 1. Look like they are doing the right thing and 2. Salvage the talent in order not to harm the company. It’s the old slap on the wrist routine with fingers crossed that no one is really watching. In the case of Dior only a few days elapsed from the time of the first reported incident to the announcement of his firing. Assuming Dior had no prior information that executives chose to ignore, let’s give the nod to Dior, for realizing that there are thousands of talented designers out in the world waiting to be discovered and for decisive action that reflected very positively on this venerable house.

Contrast this with the affaire Charlie Sheen. On March 7th it was announced by CBS and Warner Bros. Television that Sheen had been fired from the hit TV show Two and a Half Men. It is not necessary to catalog the antics of Sheen over the last months to the present. Suffice it to say that the drunken rampages, coked up babble and other extraordinary behavior reflects a troubled, delusional mind and reflects poorly on both CBS and Warner. But what reflects even more poorly on them is their handling of the crisis. Inaction and vacillation seemed to have guided them until they were backed against a wall. The most telling comment to be made on behalf of the companies was that he was a good employee, was never late, knew his lines etc.

Having your cake and eating it too, is not always possible. A more respectable and man-up approach would have been to at least put Sheen on indefinite suspension from the onset until he got the help he needs. This would have shown more concern for the actor as an individual and would have shown that doing the right thing was more important than squeezing out as many episodes as possible before the implosion. Look where it got CBS and Warner. Egg on its face as well as a suit.

But that’s human nature. No one wants to self immolate. Companies almost always want to salvage what they can. But the moral of the story is that when you do take the right course of action, you almost always live to see another day. Perhaps bruised but with more dignity and respect. Just make sure your employment contracts allow you to make subjective judgments about the injury to your reputation that an employee is creating. An employee’s job description should always contain the obligation not to undermine, and even to bring honor to, your institution. Christian Dior – what would you have done?

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DODGING THE-ALL-THE-EGGS-IN-ONE-BASKET-SYNDROME

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crises of our own making, Crisis Management Consulting, Crisis Management Planning, Diversification on January 13th, 2011 by mnayor

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will most likely cancel the $14.4 billion program to develop a Marine landing craft designed to navigate water and storm beaches. Gates’ decision represents a change in fighting strategy. Now that ships and landing craft can be hit by missiles from a range of distances it is a signal that this type of warfare may be relegated to the ash heap.

What should companies take away from this development? Easy. Doing work for the Federal Government can, no doubt, be rewarding, (even though highly frustrating; red tape can turn crimson and frustrations can escalate) but a business must be ever vigilant and conscious of the winds in Washington. Certainly many high level decisions make a great deal of sense. But others can be politically motivated, or motivated by nothing more than the need to squeeze the national budget. Whatever the reason, it behooves any company that is a government contractor, to always have an ear to the ground.

The Marine vehicle in question is being built by General Dynamics. Although the cancelled $14.4 billion program was to have been spread out over a number of years cancellation will certainly still be a blow. At the end of 2009 GD had sales of $32 billion. The Combat Systems Division alone in 2009 generated 9.6 billion in sales and the company had an overall profit of $3.7 billion. So putting the project in this proper perspective, it was not just loose change.

GD has a diversified operation. With over 90,000 employees worldwide, it does not just rely on the government for business. It has thriving Aerospace, Marine Systems and Information Technology and Systems divisions, with many commercial customers. Its Gulfstream brand of business jets is known worldwide.

The moral of the story is clear. While GD may be diversified enough to withstand the travails of cancelled programs and losses of billions of dollars in sales, not all businesses are as prepared. Crisis management is not just for the “now” when the crisis has struck and everyone is scrambling. It includes crisis planning. A way for executives to focus on this is to consider it an offshoot of long range planning. Where does the company want to be in five years? In ten? What are the company’s vulnerabilities? How do we soften the exposure?

By treating crisis management not as a something to deal with as a rarified event, but, rather, as a necessary corollary to a normal function of long range planning, you will be able to mitigate the losses that come from the cancellation of your very own amphibious landing craft project.

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NICKEL DIMING YOUR REPUTATION TO DEATH

Posted in Airline Industry, Banking Industry, Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Business Crisis Management, Crisis Management Consulting, Excessive consumer fees on December 1st, 2010 by mnayor

Whole industries have the ability to shoot themselves in the foot. Two that leap out at America daily are the airline industry and the banking industry. Single handedly, without help from anyone or anything else, they have made themselves the bad boys of American business. Could it be possible that no one in either of these industries has figured out that they were making themselves despised by the public? Could it be possible that no one in either industry can figure out how to be respected once again? The answer: so far, no.

There could not be one intelligent airline executive who believes that nickel-diming the public is a popular move – or even an acceptable move. But acceptability pales compared to the bottom line. If revenues are significantly enhanced, then the bottom line wins out. It’s certainly understandable that financial health is vital. Those who sit around the conference table and come up with the add-ons are most likely rewarded or at least singled out. But are they really doing what’s in the best interests of their companies?

Meals, pillows, blankets, luggage handling, preferred seating, bathroom use. You name it and it’s an additional charge. Who will be the corporate hero who says this is inane. Who will be the one who says we can gain a lot of goodwill by announcing the end of these charges? Who will be the one to say let’s add ten to twenty dollars to the cost of a ticket and be done with it. Let’s announce that we are back to being a full service airline. No food on short flights – OK. Smaller, simpler meals – OK. Not so many pillows and blankets to clutter the floor with – OK. Who will be the brave anti nickel-dimer?

But before you get to the airport for your aggravating trip, you first must go the bank for preliminary aggravation preparation. Use the ATM? Use your debit card and exceed your balance by 63 cents? Have a checking account you hardly use? A monthly service charge for the bank’s use of your money? Significant interest on your credit card balance? Not to worry. We’ve got you coming and going. The household name banks aren’t doing badly, thank you. Except that their success is on your back. Not quite the same as they’ve got your back.

Why rock the boat when revenues are flowing. Good enough question except it is perception and goodwill that suffer. Who is going to be the wunderkind of the banking world who steps up and says it’s time to stop? Let’s get back to being a bank. We’re supposed to lend money. We are supposed to be an important engine of the economy, not a parasite that just gorges on fees at the expense of our customers. Back to lending where we can make the same money by doing what (hopefully) we do best.

Being in an industry that, while competitive, still plays follow-the-leader often results in bad decisions that are followed blindly by the rest of the herd. Herd mentality can be dangerous. Oftentimes it takes advantage of the public. Oftentimes it undermines reputations as well. Alternatively, independent thinking can burnish images and can reap big rewards. Kudos to the big bank or the major airline that announces that it is separateing itself from the other guys.

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THE NEGATIVE PUBLICITY ENIGMA

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Business Crisis Management, Corporate Crisis Management, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Mitigation, negative publicity on December 1st, 2010 by mnayor

Robert Walker wrote an article recently in the New York Times Magazine section entitled Good News, Bad News, about the negative publicity the GAP received over its attempt to change its iconic logo; and, in general, the fallout or lack thereof that can be expected from negative attacks.

He’s got a point. The old adage that any publicity, negative or positive, is good publicity is certainly not always true. But some forms of negative publicity don’t always do harm. Such is the case with the GAP logo fiasco.

What forms of negative publicity can hurt an organization? Clearly, reports of poor goods and/or services can be harmful. Reports of Johnson & Johnson’s tainted products over the last year have not helped its image. Reports of poor airline service have the effect of customers shopping for alternatives. A hotel devastated by a hurricane or earthquake or a terrorist incident has the same effect.

Stories about poor management will also turn customers off. Look at the banking and investment banking industry. All of these kinds of negative publicity have the effect of creating a crisis, and require skilled crisis management to counter the effects. The crisis management needed has to tackle two fronts: operationally to truly “fix” the problem and crisis communication to inform the public.

But there are other forms of negative publicity that don’t affect products, services or management, such as the GAP logo situation. True, some people were offended or reacted poorly to the proposed change, but what of it? It would take an extraordinarily sensitive GAP shopper or potential GAP shopper to boycott GAP because of this event.

A business crisis is one that effects a company’s reputation or bottom line. Did an unpopular proposed logo change genuinely affect GAP’s reputation? Did it affect the company’s bottom line? I think not. If it did, it was very short-lived and very ineffective. In fact, most stories about the incident stressed the many attributes about the business, its clothing products and its branding success. While GAP would most likely have opted for no publicity over its logo, no harm was done.

The moral of the story? Manage well. Provide excellent products and services. You may still be unable to avoid negative publicity or a crisis that is beyond your control but if your base is solid you will weather the storm.

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PREEMPTION: THE TWO EDGED SWORD IN CRISIS MANAGEMENT

Posted in Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Litigation, Crisis Management, Crisis Mitigation, Liability Communications, Litigation Communications on November 3rd, 2010 by mnayor

 Crisis management and product liability are inextricably linked. Whenever a product fails and causes injury or damage to buyers, a crisis can erupt. The liability of manufacturers and vendors have tightened dramatically over the last hundred years, from the theory of caveat emptor or let the buyer beware, to today, in some cases, strict liability. State laws on matters of health (including the environment) and safety have provided consumers with greater and greater protections over the years.

Businesses of all kinds must be more diligent than ever. Even if negligence and/or misrepresentation are not at issue, a company can still find itself in a great deal of trouble. Accusations concerning causation, erroneous manufacturers’ claims, and customer-product incompatibility can raise the specter of liability and place a company at risk.

Not all products are 100% safe for all people at all times. Thus the concept of warning labels has taken on greater importance, especially in those situations where use may be abused, inappropriate or be accompanied by additional risks. We see this more and more in such industries as pharmaceuticals, foods, toys, automobiles and cosmetics. In today’s world some warnings may not be deemed sufficient because they are either not perceived as strong enough or not evident enough on packaging.

In recent years some companies and even whole industries have looked to preemption as a form of product liability protection from individual and class action suits. Federal preemption is the trumping of federal law over state law when that is the express or implied intention of Congress. Most product liability law is state law through a state’s police powers, and ultimately its state statutes, its common law and court decisions. Oftentimes, federal laws are not as tough as state laws and therefore afford more protection to business. Federal legislation, and even federal regulations, sometimes takes precedence. In fact several agencies of the federal government such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, The Federal Trade Commission and its Bureau of Consumer Protection, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have declared that some of their specific regulations preempt state law and bar or limit consumer redress. 

Federal court decisions have been mixed. In one recent Supreme Court decision the Court ruled that a medical device manufacturer could not be sued by a consumer because the manufacturer had won FDA approval. But in another, the Court held that a patient was not barred from suing a pharmaceutical company for damages just because the product displayed an FDA-approved label.

Preemption may create a dilemma for a company. Certainly, successful preemption can provide the type of protection that can avoid financial calamity. On the other hand, combative and bellicose pursuit of a safe harbor can have an extremely negative effect on a company’s reputation. It is quite easy to appear as consumer-be-damned if preemption coverage is not handled discretely. Reputation management is equally as important, and a company must strike a balance between finding that safe harbor and doing the right thing, between securing financial escape and retaining and developing public support, respect and even admiration.

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FACING A BUSINESS CRISIS OR A COST OF DOING BUSINESS

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Crisis Management Consulting on November 2nd, 2010 by mnayor

A Company admits that it erroneously charged millions of customers for services they never ordered or used. The Company plans to credit current customers and refund former customers to the tune of anywhere from $30 million to $90 million in total. Most companies would consider this a crisis, especially since the regulatory commission with jurisdiction over it says it hasn’t finished with these guys.

Well, not so fast. The Company had been notified at least two years ago that they were overcharging, and did nothing about it. After all, customer service is expensive. Why dig into this messy situation if by ignoring it, customers might give up and go away. The loss to an individual consumer may be a pittance, but the possible refunds may be huge, thereby justifying the gamble that the situation won’t come to light. Even if the Company is caught, things like this happen all the time. The adverse publicity, if there is any, will blow over, and this is a business risk the Company is willing to take.

The Company in this case is Verizon. The Federal Communications Commission continues its investigation and may start a formal proceeding. But Verizon may have already calculated this into the bottom line cost. More and more U.S. companies are consciously deciding to take on bigger and bigger risks. Stated another way, more and more companies are deciding to be dishonest, whether by design or by simply ignoring facts. Some start out to cheat – inferior raw materials, child labor, the list is endless. Others don’t set out to be dishonest but decide not to correct mistakes because of the expense. In today’s environment most companies feel they can weather the storm.

It was recently reported that GlaxoSmithKline, PLC (GSK) agreed to pay $750 million to settle charges that between 2001 and 2005 they distributed adulterated drugs made at its now-closed manufacturing facility in Cidra, Puerto Rico. Authorities said a corporate whistleblower had filed a lawsuit against GSK under provisions of the U.S. False Claims Act. A GSK spokesperson stated that “We regret that we operated the Cidra facility in a manner that was inconsistent with current Good Manufacturing Practice requirements and with GSK’s commitment to manufacturing quality.  GSK worked hard to resolve fully the manufacturing issues at the Cidra facility prior to its closure in 2009 and we are committed to continuous improvement in our manufacturing processes…”   The GSK Puerto Rico subsidiary, SB Pharmco Puerto Rico Inc., will plead guilty to a crime and pay a $150 million fine, including forfeiting assets of $10 million. Under a separate agreement, GSK will pay $600 million to settle federal government and related state claims under the False Claims Act. The guilty plea and sentence is not final until accepted by the U.S. District Court in Boston.

In other lawsuits pharma companies have been accused of paying money to doctors to prescribe their brand-name medications and, in some cases, telling physicians to push “off-label” uses of the drugs which is prohibited by federal law. In the last few years pharma companies have paid up to $7 billion in settlements, criminal and civil fines, and have pled guilty to misdemeanor and sometimes felony charges.

While making these admissions, many continue to assert that they use the highest ethical standards in conducting their businesses, or they are in full compliance with FDA requirements and regulations, or that they continue to operate in the best interest of the public.

It is difficult not to read or hear news almost daily about companies getting caught doing something indifferent to the public interest or unethical in one way or another. The stories no longer appear to be the exception but rather are beginning to constitute business as usual and most people really don’t care unless they are directly involved. Have we come to the point that American business is expected to be dishonest? Is bad behavior so common that a case like these don’t even get a second glance?  Are responsible decisions being replaced by risk analysis? And is crisis management being relied on to merely cover one’s tracks?

Is it possible to revert to the good old days when companies tried to do what was right most of the time, and crisis management was a tool relied on to protect and respond to the public interest, as well as enhance and protect reputations.

Portions of this article were published in Bernstein Crisis Management: http://www.bernsteincrisismanagement.com/nl/crisis-manager-101101.html

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WHAT REALLY CONSTITUTES A BUSINESS CRISIS

Posted in Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Crisis Communication Failures, Crisis Communication Response, Crisis Communication Strategy, new customers at the expense of old customers, What is a Business Crisis on October 5th, 2010 by mnayor

 A business crisis can be anything that can negatively effect a company’s reputation or bottom line. Many events at first blush may not appear to be serious. HP’s firing of Mark Hurd and the subsequent entanglement with Oracle was not a big deal in the scheme of things, even though internally it must have been a shocker. However, the death or resignation of a key person in any organization could very well be serious for any company depending on just how key that person really was. Natural catastrophes, product recalls, labor disputes, computer data losses. The list is endless. Some are temporary. Some can cause the demise of a company. Most can be handled with honesty and the realization that it may be necessary to absorb losses over the short haul in order to achieve a long and healthy business life.

Two distinct categories of crisis need to be recognized. In one we lump all those events over which we have no control, such as product tampering by outside forces or natural disasters. Even in these situations there are always some actions we can take: tamper-proof packaging, liability insurance, proper protocols. But generally these events can blind-side us.

The second category contains all those events that might have been avoided had we chosen to take the actions necessary to protect ourselves and the public. Some are obvious. We look at the BP oil spill and see things that surely could have been done.  Other events are not so obvious and these are the ones that can be insidious. When a management believes it is doing the right thing but in fact is fueling a potential crisis we have the makings of a catastrophe. A couple of examples will make this abundantly clear.

Market share is usually very important to a company, oddly sometimes more important than the bottom line. There is always great competition for new customers. Many times the efforts and resources devoted to advertising, marketing and selling to new customers are at the expense of a company’s loyal  customer base. This can even be seen at the local level. Where I live heating oil companies consistently offer new customers a deal for the first year in order to lure them in. This, of course, is done at the expense of old, loyal customers who have to make up the slack. The result is that many savvy oil customers these days do a lot of shopping each year to find the best deal. Loyalty is a thing of the past. On a national level the problem has gotten even more serious. A recent financial story in The New Yorker last month observed that there is almost universal recognition that customer service in this country has deteriorated. Such service is considered a “cost”. Companies are looking for the customers they don’t have so they are willing to spend on marketing and advertising but are not as interested in adding to their costs of service. The article made it sound a little like cynical dating. Companies are interested in luring you in but then once they have you, they don’t quite value you as much as the next potential customer they want to corral.

Lack of service is not just a pain for helpless consumers. In this internet age they can do something about it. This is how a company can sow the seeds of its own destruction, and inexorably create its own crisis. Companies and their products and services are being rated on the internet and consumers don’t hold back. They tell it like it is. Granted, competitors may be planting some of these negative comments but for the most part product and service evaluations are being taken at face value. The moral of the story: be faithful to those who brought you to the dance, or the consequences could be severe.

Another form of self-inflicted crisis involves weathering the storm. Whether in politics, professional sports, or in business, “players” still believe that because of their importance they can ride out any issue or problem. They can’t. We can all easily tick off a dozen or so examples, but the latest is surprising. Johnson & Johnson has recently gone through a spate of recalls of tainted children’s Tylenol and Motrin. The Company has generally kept a low profile and even contracted with a third party to buy up Motrin off retail shelves rather than announce an actual recall. And for the last decade it has been settling with claimants for a variety of injuries and death allegedly due from Ortho Evra, a contraceptive patch made by its subsidiary, Ortho McNeil. It appears clear that the current management of J&J has not followed in the footsteps of the management that handled the Tylenol crisis of 1982 which is often cited as the quintessential example of crisis management in modern corporate history. Back then cyanide had been found in bottles of Tylenol in the Chicago area. J&J immediately issued public warnings, issued a product recall, created tamper-proof packaging, and before long was back in business. The Company was up-front and willing to bite the bullet in the best interests of the public. Unfortunately that does not appear to be the philosophy today. There is clearly a danger in believing one’s invincibility. The trust and respect of the public is at stake, and once lost, is very difficult to retrieve.

A crisis is not just the obvious explosion at a plant or a mine. Companies can and do create their own crises. Companies must evaluate their philosophy, their strategy and their honesty. They must take action to minimize their vulnerabilities but at the same time be prepared to take action in the best interests of the public if they value company longevity.

Originally published in the Management Help Library of  http://managementhelp.org/blogs/crisis-management/2010/10/13/what-really-constitutes-a-business-crisis/

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