THE CASCADING DECLINE AT THE BBC

Posted in BBC, Corporate Crisis Management, Covering for the organization, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Response, Crisis Mitigation, fix the problem, Protecting the organization at any cost?, the effect of ignoring a problem on November 14th, 2012 by mnayor

Covering for the organization rarely works. Neither does the belief that an organization is so strong and respected that it exits on a level all its own.PennStateofficials found that out recently and now the BBC is suffering from the same ill-advised mentality. Whistle-blowing is a separate but related topic but the concerted effort of many in positions of power at an organization to hide something or sweep it under the rug deserves special attention.

 

For many years a popular, long-time host at BBC, Jimmy Savile, was suspected of sexually abusing young people, sometimes even at the premises of the BBC. The Company recently came under blistering attack when it was learned that an investigation of Savile had been cancelled by the editor of BBC’s Newsnight program last year. Newsnight is an important current affairs program of the BBC. Mark Thompson, the BBC’s Director General until last month (and who is destined to join the New York Times shortly) claims to have had no knowledge of the accusations against Savile although there were many opportunities to delve into the matter if he chose to do so.

 

Within the last week and in a matter of weeks since Thompson’s departure, his successor, George Entwistle, resigned because of another flap, again involving Newsnight, which wrongly implicated a Conservative Party politician in a pedophile scandal inWales. And just yesterday the BBC’s Director of News, Helen Boaden and her deputy, Stephen Mitchell announced that they have “stepped aside”.

 

The upshot is that there is turmoil at the BBC. There is a lack of control and the Chairman of the BBC Trust has acknowledged that the organization is in a ghastly mess and in need of a thorough overhaul.

 

How does any organization get itself into this type of crisis and what types of crisis management are called for? First, hubris plays a significant role. When an organization attains a stratospheric reputation such as that of the BBC, those who personify it not only begin to believe in its infallibility but also in their own. Heightened reputations beget dizzying overconfidence. Secondly, there is a tendency of employees, whether they be worker bees or top management to put their employer above all else. Not many people want to be held responsible for the decline or unraveling of an organization. Most want to be team players, no matter what they know and no matter what they really think about their place of work.

 

Crisis management calls for continual checks and balances. An organization cannot continue to coast, as many do, on old and outdated reputations. It is incumbent on top management, and lower levels in turn, to clarify lines of responsibility and authority, to define the values of the organization, to impose clear lines of accountability and to review regularly issues that arise. Often, top management wishes to be insulated from bad decisions already made, and hard decisions that need to be made, even with the knowledge that, more often than not, the buck stops with them and they may be the sacrificial lambs regardless.

Crisis management does not just mean planning to avoid a crisis if possible. Nor does it just mean managing a crisis once it hits. It also means taking steps to mitigate a crisis in the works. A CEO and his/her lieutenants are charged with monitoring the ship as a captain of a vessel or plane would. Rectifying what is wrong is a vital part of the job. Time does not absorb and dissolve a bad decision. It only heightens the culpability of the parties who either made no attempt to rectify it or tried to white-wash it. This is a hard lesson for people such as the former President of Penn State and the late Joe Paterno. It is a hard lesson for the former and current management of the BBC.

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J&J: IT’S ABOUT TIME OR MORE OF THE SAME

Posted in a ggod reputation guarantees long term profits, Business Crises We Create, cheating the public, Corporate Crisis Management, corporate integrity, Crisis Management, Crisis Management Response, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Hurting customers, J&J, Johnson & Johnson, Respect your customers, Taking Responsibility for actions of an organization or its employees, when the bottom line is more important than your customers, William Weldon on February 22nd, 2012 by mnayor

 In October of 2010 I highlighted many of the difficulties Johnson & Johnson had been going through since the early part of the decade, from tens of millions of dollars to settle claims against its product Ortho Evra, to product recalls including children’s Tylenol and contact lenses. Other telling issues involved a wrongful termination suit by a whistle blower and a resignation by a senior executive whose conscience would not allow him to remain at J&J knowing what he knew about Ortho Evra.

My conclusion was simply that J&J’s management had veered way off course and had sullied the reputation of one ofAmerica’s greatest corporations, one that was known and respected for its integrity and honesty. I ended with an expression of hope that the lessons learned would set management on the right course once again.

 This was not to be. Just this past week the press reported that J&J took a year to recall a version of its artificial hip after the FDA refused in 2009 to approve it because of its high rate of failures. The device was recalled in 2010, and J&J maintained until that time that the device was safe and its own studies refuted the allegations of professionals. J&J continued to market the hip in Europe and other overseas countries until the recall and sold another version of its hip that didn’t need safety approval in theU.S., even though the hip socket cup, which the FDA found to be flawed, was the same in both products.

 It is interesting to track the timeline of most of J&J’s recent woes to the timeline of William C. Weldon’s tenure as chief executive. Whether directly attributable to Weldon’s misfeasance or malfeasance is not the issue. The torrent of missteps, mistakes,  dishonesty, deception and manipulation has occurred on his watch. The least that can be said without pointing a finger directly at him is that he failed miserably to instill a sense of integrity within the company, a sense of integrity that transcends the needs of the short-term bottom line. So many executives foolishly sit at their desks with blinders on. Weldon and his followers allowed a culture to fester within their walls that calls for the good of the company to transcend the good of the public.

 No executive worth his title would allow the disintegration that has taken place at J&J. Thankfully, William Weldon will step down in April of this year although he will remain as chairman. Alex Gorsky will be the new CEO. Has the Board done the Company, its shareholders and the public a major disservice? Gorsky is cut from the same cloth as Weldon. They both cut their teeth in sales and both are sensitive to the bottom line and enhancing it above all else.  Hopefully Gorsky will recognize the need to build trust, and instill honor from which J&J can once again earn the widespread respect of the public. Build it and they will come. With that will come the financial success that Weldon’s crew tried to obtain on the cheap. If Gorsky has not learned from past mistakes, expect more of the same from J&J. We will all be witness to the transformation of a great American company into just another self-serving medical conglomerate that feeds off the public.

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PENN STATE AND OLYMPUS CORP.: WHAT THEY HAVE IN COMMON

Posted in Crisis Communication Response, Doing the right thing, Ethics and Crisis Management, Olympus Corp., Penn State, reputation management, Sacrifice the Little Guy, Taking Responsibility for actions of an organization or its employees on November 19th, 2011 by mnayor

Two scandals this week couldn’t seem more different. One involves allegations of pedophilia sex at a university, Penn State and the other financial shenanigans at a large Japanese corporation, Olympus Corp. Most in the public relations field would exclaim that both matters require “crisis management”, but there is a closer commonality than that. We have to look at the underlying cause of these scandals to see what they share in common.

In many crisis situations the crisis comes about by an outside force or a factor beyond an organization’s control or ability to anticipate. There are, of course, natural disasters. There can be strikes, new legislation, unexpected competition, employee dishonesty, product contamination and the list goes on. Most organizations are “forgiven” or the matter is soon forgotten if the issue is dealt with promptly. Even the BP Gulf oil spill has receded from our memories because the company dealt with the calamity, no matter how ineptly.

But certain “crises” are either created or exacerbated by an organization itself. There are many participants, willing or scared or just amoral who put the organization first. These types of issues should not be looked upon as crises but as severe ethical failures. Oftentimes the principal players either feel they have no choice, or stick their collective heads in the sand or worst of all, feel they won’t be caught and therefore have no compunction about doing what they see as best for the organization. This is what Penn State and Olympus have in common –people have done something unconscionable and others who know about it do nothing or as little as possible. No one wants to be a whistle blower. Willingly or unwillingly, everyone wants to be a loyal team player.

From politicians to entertainers to corporate CEO’s, there is an ever-growing tendency to believe “I can get away with it”, or “it’s not my problem”, or “let’s not rock the boat” or “I’m not going to stick my neck out”.

These days the words “ethics” and “morals” are used interchangeably Elijah Weber described the difference this way:

“Morals, quite simply, are beliefs about right and wrong conduct….They do not require reason, consistency, or thorough analysis in their initial shaping or practical application…. I can believe that lying is wrong because my grandmother told me it was, and that is what I believe. No further justification is required. Ethics, on the other hand, is a reason based cumulative system of moral decision making. It is built upon one or a few basic principles and requires that we be thorough, honest, and comprehensive in making statements about right and wrong. Ethics is about building the kind of world we want to live in, and developing a consistent process by which to achieve this. Ethics is an advanced expression of morality.”

I like this analysis of ethics: a few basic principles that require that we be thorough, honest, and comprehensive in making statements about right and wrong. It is about building the kind of world we want to live in…Do we wish to live in a world where we turn a blind eye to child sexual abuse? Do we want to turn a blind eye to Ponzi schemes and product failings and financial manipulations built on sand that will have severe consequences to investors, employees, and consumers? I think not.
No one is naive enough to think that every company, every charitable organization, every university will adhere to the straight and narrow but wouldn’t it be refreshing if we could count on ethical behavior most of the time. Wouldn’t it also be nice if every honest whistle blower who performed a public service wasn’t maligned and attacked as a weasel or turn-coat? Wouldn’t it be interesting if every organization that breached ethical norms, faced its predicament responsibly Since it is not possible to have a perfect world, shouldn’t we at least shine a spotlight on those who perpetuate bad conduct no matter how revered, competent and respected they may have been?

I fear that the opposite usually occurs. The whistleblower is a turncoat. The person who tried to do the right thing didn’t do enough. The head honcho and the organization are protected as best as possible. The little guy gets thrown under the bus.

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DODGING THE-ALL-THE-EGGS-IN-ONE-BASKET-SYNDROME

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Anticipation, Business Crises of our own making, Crisis Management Consulting, Crisis Management Planning, Diversification on January 13th, 2011 by mnayor

Secretary of Defense Robert Gates will most likely cancel the $14.4 billion program to develop a Marine landing craft designed to navigate water and storm beaches. Gates’ decision represents a change in fighting strategy. Now that ships and landing craft can be hit by missiles from a range of distances it is a signal that this type of warfare may be relegated to the ash heap.

What should companies take away from this development? Easy. Doing work for the Federal Government can, no doubt, be rewarding, (even though highly frustrating; red tape can turn crimson and frustrations can escalate) but a business must be ever vigilant and conscious of the winds in Washington. Certainly many high level decisions make a great deal of sense. But others can be politically motivated, or motivated by nothing more than the need to squeeze the national budget. Whatever the reason, it behooves any company that is a government contractor, to always have an ear to the ground.

The Marine vehicle in question is being built by General Dynamics. Although the cancelled $14.4 billion program was to have been spread out over a number of years cancellation will certainly still be a blow. At the end of 2009 GD had sales of $32 billion. The Combat Systems Division alone in 2009 generated 9.6 billion in sales and the company had an overall profit of $3.7 billion. So putting the project in this proper perspective, it was not just loose change.

GD has a diversified operation. With over 90,000 employees worldwide, it does not just rely on the government for business. It has thriving Aerospace, Marine Systems and Information Technology and Systems divisions, with many commercial customers. Its Gulfstream brand of business jets is known worldwide.

The moral of the story is clear. While GD may be diversified enough to withstand the travails of cancelled programs and losses of billions of dollars in sales, not all businesses are as prepared. Crisis management is not just for the “now” when the crisis has struck and everyone is scrambling. It includes crisis planning. A way for executives to focus on this is to consider it an offshoot of long range planning. Where does the company want to be in five years? In ten? What are the company’s vulnerabilities? How do we soften the exposure?

By treating crisis management not as a something to deal with as a rarified event, but, rather, as a necessary corollary to a normal function of long range planning, you will be able to mitigate the losses that come from the cancellation of your very own amphibious landing craft project.

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THE NEGATIVE PUBLICITY ENIGMA

Posted in Anticipating A Crisis, Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Business Crisis Management, Corporate Crisis Management, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Management, Crisis Mitigation, negative publicity on December 1st, 2010 by mnayor

Robert Walker wrote an article recently in the New York Times Magazine section entitled Good News, Bad News, about the negative publicity the GAP received over its attempt to change its iconic logo; and, in general, the fallout or lack thereof that can be expected from negative attacks.

He’s got a point. The old adage that any publicity, negative or positive, is good publicity is certainly not always true. But some forms of negative publicity don’t always do harm. Such is the case with the GAP logo fiasco.

What forms of negative publicity can hurt an organization? Clearly, reports of poor goods and/or services can be harmful. Reports of Johnson & Johnson’s tainted products over the last year have not helped its image. Reports of poor airline service have the effect of customers shopping for alternatives. A hotel devastated by a hurricane or earthquake or a terrorist incident has the same effect.

Stories about poor management will also turn customers off. Look at the banking and investment banking industry. All of these kinds of negative publicity have the effect of creating a crisis, and require skilled crisis management to counter the effects. The crisis management needed has to tackle two fronts: operationally to truly “fix” the problem and crisis communication to inform the public.

But there are other forms of negative publicity that don’t affect products, services or management, such as the GAP logo situation. True, some people were offended or reacted poorly to the proposed change, but what of it? It would take an extraordinarily sensitive GAP shopper or potential GAP shopper to boycott GAP because of this event.

A business crisis is one that effects a company’s reputation or bottom line. Did an unpopular proposed logo change genuinely affect GAP’s reputation? Did it affect the company’s bottom line? I think not. If it did, it was very short-lived and very ineffective. In fact, most stories about the incident stressed the many attributes about the business, its clothing products and its branding success. While GAP would most likely have opted for no publicity over its logo, no harm was done.

The moral of the story? Manage well. Provide excellent products and services. You may still be unable to avoid negative publicity or a crisis that is beyond your control but if your base is solid you will weather the storm.

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PREEMPTION: THE TWO EDGED SWORD IN CRISIS MANAGEMENT

Posted in Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Crisis Communication Strategy, Crisis Litigation, Crisis Management, Crisis Mitigation, Liability Communications, Litigation Communications on November 3rd, 2010 by mnayor

 Crisis management and product liability are inextricably linked. Whenever a product fails and causes injury or damage to buyers, a crisis can erupt. The liability of manufacturers and vendors have tightened dramatically over the last hundred years, from the theory of caveat emptor or let the buyer beware, to today, in some cases, strict liability. State laws on matters of health (including the environment) and safety have provided consumers with greater and greater protections over the years.

Businesses of all kinds must be more diligent than ever. Even if negligence and/or misrepresentation are not at issue, a company can still find itself in a great deal of trouble. Accusations concerning causation, erroneous manufacturers’ claims, and customer-product incompatibility can raise the specter of liability and place a company at risk.

Not all products are 100% safe for all people at all times. Thus the concept of warning labels has taken on greater importance, especially in those situations where use may be abused, inappropriate or be accompanied by additional risks. We see this more and more in such industries as pharmaceuticals, foods, toys, automobiles and cosmetics. In today’s world some warnings may not be deemed sufficient because they are either not perceived as strong enough or not evident enough on packaging.

In recent years some companies and even whole industries have looked to preemption as a form of product liability protection from individual and class action suits. Federal preemption is the trumping of federal law over state law when that is the express or implied intention of Congress. Most product liability law is state law through a state’s police powers, and ultimately its state statutes, its common law and court decisions. Oftentimes, federal laws are not as tough as state laws and therefore afford more protection to business. Federal legislation, and even federal regulations, sometimes takes precedence. In fact several agencies of the federal government such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, The Federal Trade Commission and its Bureau of Consumer Protection, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have declared that some of their specific regulations preempt state law and bar or limit consumer redress. 

Federal court decisions have been mixed. In one recent Supreme Court decision the Court ruled that a medical device manufacturer could not be sued by a consumer because the manufacturer had won FDA approval. But in another, the Court held that a patient was not barred from suing a pharmaceutical company for damages just because the product displayed an FDA-approved label.

Preemption may create a dilemma for a company. Certainly, successful preemption can provide the type of protection that can avoid financial calamity. On the other hand, combative and bellicose pursuit of a safe harbor can have an extremely negative effect on a company’s reputation. It is quite easy to appear as consumer-be-damned if preemption coverage is not handled discretely. Reputation management is equally as important, and a company must strike a balance between finding that safe harbor and doing the right thing, between securing financial escape and retaining and developing public support, respect and even admiration.

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WHAT REALLY CONSTITUTES A BUSINESS CRISIS

Posted in Business Crises of our own making, Business Crises We Create, Crisis Communication Failures, Crisis Communication Response, Crisis Communication Strategy, new customers at the expense of old customers, What is a Business Crisis on October 5th, 2010 by mnayor

 A business crisis can be anything that can negatively effect a company’s reputation or bottom line. Many events at first blush may not appear to be serious. HP’s firing of Mark Hurd and the subsequent entanglement with Oracle was not a big deal in the scheme of things, even though internally it must have been a shocker. However, the death or resignation of a key person in any organization could very well be serious for any company depending on just how key that person really was. Natural catastrophes, product recalls, labor disputes, computer data losses. The list is endless. Some are temporary. Some can cause the demise of a company. Most can be handled with honesty and the realization that it may be necessary to absorb losses over the short haul in order to achieve a long and healthy business life.

Two distinct categories of crisis need to be recognized. In one we lump all those events over which we have no control, such as product tampering by outside forces or natural disasters. Even in these situations there are always some actions we can take: tamper-proof packaging, liability insurance, proper protocols. But generally these events can blind-side us.

The second category contains all those events that might have been avoided had we chosen to take the actions necessary to protect ourselves and the public. Some are obvious. We look at the BP oil spill and see things that surely could have been done.  Other events are not so obvious and these are the ones that can be insidious. When a management believes it is doing the right thing but in fact is fueling a potential crisis we have the makings of a catastrophe. A couple of examples will make this abundantly clear.

Market share is usually very important to a company, oddly sometimes more important than the bottom line. There is always great competition for new customers. Many times the efforts and resources devoted to advertising, marketing and selling to new customers are at the expense of a company’s loyal  customer base. This can even be seen at the local level. Where I live heating oil companies consistently offer new customers a deal for the first year in order to lure them in. This, of course, is done at the expense of old, loyal customers who have to make up the slack. The result is that many savvy oil customers these days do a lot of shopping each year to find the best deal. Loyalty is a thing of the past. On a national level the problem has gotten even more serious. A recent financial story in The New Yorker last month observed that there is almost universal recognition that customer service in this country has deteriorated. Such service is considered a “cost”. Companies are looking for the customers they don’t have so they are willing to spend on marketing and advertising but are not as interested in adding to their costs of service. The article made it sound a little like cynical dating. Companies are interested in luring you in but then once they have you, they don’t quite value you as much as the next potential customer they want to corral.

Lack of service is not just a pain for helpless consumers. In this internet age they can do something about it. This is how a company can sow the seeds of its own destruction, and inexorably create its own crisis. Companies and their products and services are being rated on the internet and consumers don’t hold back. They tell it like it is. Granted, competitors may be planting some of these negative comments but for the most part product and service evaluations are being taken at face value. The moral of the story: be faithful to those who brought you to the dance, or the consequences could be severe.

Another form of self-inflicted crisis involves weathering the storm. Whether in politics, professional sports, or in business, “players” still believe that because of their importance they can ride out any issue or problem. They can’t. We can all easily tick off a dozen or so examples, but the latest is surprising. Johnson & Johnson has recently gone through a spate of recalls of tainted children’s Tylenol and Motrin. The Company has generally kept a low profile and even contracted with a third party to buy up Motrin off retail shelves rather than announce an actual recall. And for the last decade it has been settling with claimants for a variety of injuries and death allegedly due from Ortho Evra, a contraceptive patch made by its subsidiary, Ortho McNeil. It appears clear that the current management of J&J has not followed in the footsteps of the management that handled the Tylenol crisis of 1982 which is often cited as the quintessential example of crisis management in modern corporate history. Back then cyanide had been found in bottles of Tylenol in the Chicago area. J&J immediately issued public warnings, issued a product recall, created tamper-proof packaging, and before long was back in business. The Company was up-front and willing to bite the bullet in the best interests of the public. Unfortunately that does not appear to be the philosophy today. There is clearly a danger in believing one’s invincibility. The trust and respect of the public is at stake, and once lost, is very difficult to retrieve.

A crisis is not just the obvious explosion at a plant or a mine. Companies can and do create their own crises. Companies must evaluate their philosophy, their strategy and their honesty. They must take action to minimize their vulnerabilities but at the same time be prepared to take action in the best interests of the public if they value company longevity.

Originally published in the Management Help Library of  http://managementhelp.org/blogs/crisis-management/2010/10/13/what-really-constitutes-a-business-crisis/

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